Hours of Operation

Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm

Thu: 9am-5pm

Fri: 9am-6pm

Sat: 9am-2pm

Sun: Closed

Most major holidays: Closed

 

Phone: (813) 481-6944

 

Address: 998 W Brandon Blvd

City, ST Zip: Brandon, FL 33511

 

Veteran 
Owned Business

 

 

 

 

On Wings of Gold - Channel

On Wings of Gold You Tube Channel

Reading Tires

When buying tires for a motorcycle, vehicle owners can determine the correct tire size by matching up the speed rating to the bike type. It does no good to have racing tires installed on a cruising motorcycle and vice versa. The same goes for the load rating of a tire, with more powerful and heavier motorcycles requiring a larger load rating.

Riders must also remember the different tire numbers, largely dependent on the tire designation used, including metric, inch, or alphanumeric, as each different designation reads differently. Before buying tires, make sure to read over the different tire measuring systems, learn how to convert between the three tire measurement systems, and take a look at popular brands of motorcycle tires. And, as with all things to do with vehicle components, research any unanswered questions online or ask a motorcycle tire specialist.

Motorcycle Tire Designations

Motorcycle tires come in a variety of sizes and types. The most common types of tires are sport, cruising, off-road, and racing tires. The following sections detail the tire size printed on the side of a motorcycle tire, including section width, the speed rating, rim width, and other criteria. How this information is presented mostly depends on the type of measuring system used. The most common tire size number types are listed below.

Metric Measuring System

The most common of the tire size designations, known as the metric measurement, begins with the section width. The table below contains the five parts of a metric tire number.

Designation

Order

Definition

Section Width

First

The tires width in millimeters, measured in a straight line from one edge of the tire’s tread to the other edge

Aspect Ratio

Second

The ratio between the tire’s width and its height; the higher the aspect ratio, the taller the tire will be

Rim Diameter

Third

Measured in inches, the measurement from the inside lip of the rim on one side to the inside lip of the rim on the other side

Load Rating

Fourth

Each tire type is specified with a specific load rating; the higher the number, the more weight the tire can safely bear

Speed Rating

Fifth

The speed rating indicates the maximum speed for that specific tire

When buying tires, make sure that the tire size fits the rim. Otherwise, the tire can have a blowout, as tire too large for a rim will not create a seal with the rim.

Inch Measuring System

Used for stock and very basic tire sizes, the inch system of motorcycle tire numbering does not see common use. The following section contains the four designations and how they are ordered in an inch tire number.

Designation

Order

Definition

Section Width

First

Measured in millimeters, the section width is measured in a straight line starting from one edge of the tire’s tread and extending to the other edge

Speed Rating

Second

Signification of the maximum operating speed of the tire

Rim Diameter

Third

The measurement, in inches, from one rim lip to the other on a wheel

Casing Strength

Fourth

Also referred to as the ply rating; this number indicates the number of plies, or layers, that make up the tire’s wall

While this numbering system does not see much use, it is one of the easier to understand. The inch system is akin to the car tire measurement system.

Alphanumeric Measurement System

Largely phased out by metric tire numbers, alphanumeric codes are uncommon on today’s tires. The following section contains the five parts of an alphanumeric tire number.

Designation

Order

Definition

Motorcycle Code

First

The first letter on all alphanumeric tire numbers for motorcycles is "M," which stands for motorcycle

Tire Width Code

Second

Width code associated with the alphanumeric system of tire numbering

Aspect ratio

Third

The ratio of the height to the width of the tire; tires with a larger aspect ratio are taller

Rim Diameter

Fourth

Measured from the inside lip of the rim on one side to the inside lip of the rim on the other side; measured in inches

Load Range

Fifth

Load range determines how much weight a tire can safely carry before it fails

The alphanumeric motorcycle tire numbering system is a British invention that has been replaced by the newer metric tire numbering system, though the inch measuring system also sometimes sees use.

Tire Conversions Charts

With all the different numbering systems in use, motorcycle owners can easily get confused as to what one number or letter used in one numbering system means in another. The sections below cross reference measurements from one motorcycle tire numbering system with the others to help shoppers make important distinctions between the three systems most commonly used.

Front Tire

Motorcycle front tires impart control to the bike rider, so make sure to place the correctly sized tire on the front rim. The following table gives the tire size conversions across all three numbering systems.

Metric

Alpha

Inch

80/90

MH90

2.50/2.75

90/90

MJ90

2.75/3.00

100/90

MM90

3.25/3.50

120/80

-

4.25/4.50

120/90

MR90

4.25/4.50

130/90

MT90

5.00/5.10

Shoppers should watch for wear on their motorcycle front tires, and be especially watchful for cupping. Once a motorcycle tire has suffered sufficient wear, make sure to replace it to prevent bike damage or rider injury.

Rear Tire

Motorcycle rear tires provide balance and stability to a motorcycle, particularly when braking, as the rear brakes are meant to stabilize a bike during a stop, with most of the braking force coming from the front brakes. The following table defines the conversions between the three numbering systems.

Metric

 Alpha

Inch

110/90

MP85

4.00/4.75

120/90

MR90

4.50/4.75

130/80

-

5.00/5.10

140/80

-

5.50/6.00

140/90

MU90

5.50/6.00

150/80

MV85

6.00/6.25

150/90

MV85

6.00/6.25

Rear tires are often bigger in the size of the tread than motorcycle front tires. This helps provide balance and stability, especially while stopped.

Tire Speed Rating

Motorcycle tires are rated for a certain speed when they are designed. This is the maximum speed they should be driven at while on the road. Driving faster than the maximum rated speed can lead to tire failure, bike damage, and possible injury or death. The following chart gives motorcycle tire speed ratings.

Tire Speed Ratings

Max. Design Speeds

Test Speed

J Type

62

100

N Type

87

140

P Type

94

150

S Type

112

180

H Type

130

210

V Type

149

240

Z Type

149+

240+

The above speeds signify tires at the proper air pressure and in optimum riding conditions. Riders should take care when traveling in adverse conditions. Also, observe all posted speed limits when riding a motorcycle.

Motorcycle Tire Load Index

A motorcycle’s tire load is the amount of weight that the tire can bear when traveling on the road. Surpassing these limits can lead to tire failure, which can ultimately result in damage to the bike and injury to the rider. The following table lists a sampling of the tire load index and the corresponding weight limit in both kilograms and pounds.

Load Index

Kilograms

Pounds

43

155

342

49

185

408

50

190

419

60

250

551

68

315

694

71

345

761

72

355

783

78

425

937

79

437

963

80

450

992

81

462

1019

82

475

1047

83

487

1074

89

580

1279

90

600

1323

It is important when reading the load index rating that riders understand the difference between kilograms and pounds. Also, when buying tires keep the weight of the motorcycle foremost in mind, as a heavier bike requires higher rated tires.

Popular Brands of Motorcycle Tires

Check out the following list for popular brands of motorcycle tires, including Dunlop, Michelin, and IRC, among many others.

$1·             Dunlop

$1·             Avon

$1·             Bridgestone

$1·             Michelin

$1·             Pirelli

$1·             Metzeler

$1·             Shinko

Conclusion

Knowing how to read the numbering on a motorcycle tire allows vehicle owners to choose the correct tires for their bike. Learning how to make the correct distinction between different tire classifications is vital, as choosing the wrong tire can lead to tire failure.

Of course, bike owners can just copy down the numbering from their current tires. The problem lies when upgrading to a different tire entirely. If unsure about what type of tire to buy for a bike, owners can always look online or consult with a motorcycle tire specialist or professional for more information. Remember to be aware of the state of wear on each tire so they can be replaced before getting to the point of tire failure. This can prevent bike damage and possible rider injury.

 

Featured


 

 

Each Month will have a Featured Item
Part, Accessories, Bike, etc,

Read More

Services


 

 

We offer full service

on most makes and models.

Read More

Pre-Owned


 

Check out our Pre-Owned

Bikes, Trikes, Sidecars,

Trailers and ATV's

Read More

Contacts


 

 

Contact us by

Phone, email or snail mail.

Read More

Join our Forum

 

Also we are working on our own Local Forum for you to check out Click Here